Mar 10, 2013
Door Time: 7:00 PM
Presented By: ForTheLoveOf Punk, Channel 93.3 and Illegal Petes

Day: Sunday, March 10, 2013
Door Time: 7:00 PM
Age: All Ages
Advance Ticket Price: $13
Day Of Show Price: $15
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Swingin Utters

Man, these days everyone with a chipped tooth and a bad haircut says they’re street punk. It’s almost gotten to the point where it just seems like gimmickry, like being bi-polar or good looking. But once in a while, a dude who works in a warehouse gets together with a truck driver and makes shit kickin’ punk rock songs so ball-smashingly radical that they end up getting the guys from Me First and the Gimme Gimmes and One Man Army to help ‘em sing, and the end result is everybody’s favorite San Francisco institution that isn’t completely riddled with glory holes, the Swingin’ Utters. I know what you’re saying: what the fuck am I doing reading a Swingin’ Utters bio in 2011? Sure, they’re pretty much the trailblaizenist band that ever decided to put grandpa’s banjo and spittoon next to the marshall full stacks and the booze, but what have they done lately? Well, I’ll tell you, you impudent young whippersnapper. They’ve recorded Here, Under Protest, the single best album of their already award winning career (handsomest ballsack on a punk, 2001-02 [Darius]) and that’s saying something. It’s, as Ron Burgundy would attest, a pretty big deal.

It’s a big deal because the Utters have been kicking ass since even before 1995’s The Streets Of San Francisco, which was so good that it got them signed to Fat Wreck Chords (back when that was a hard thing to do [Heyo!]), got them the attention of pretty much everyone that listens to good, aggressive music, got them on the Warped Tour and even won them a Bay Area Music award or two. Now, I know what you’re thinking, and sure, awards shows can be a self congratulatory blow-a-thon, but when a bunch of vagabonds like the Utters stroll in drunk wearing Dickies and tee shirts and stagger out with some awards, to the chagrin of all the dipshits, well, that’s pretty cool, right? Of course. So what happened then?

Well, they put out a ton of great records, including A Juvenile Product of the Working Class, Five Lessons Learned, Dead Flowers, Bottles, Bluegrass, and Bones, an eponymous record, and a veritable shit-ton of EP’s and live stuff, toured relentlessly with such little-known bands as Rancid, NOFX, The Damned and Dropkick Murphys, sold over two hundred thousand records, annexed the golden voiced Spike Slawson of Me First and the Gimme Gimmes fame on bass and vocals, convinced Jack from Dead to Me and One Man Army to start playing guitar and singin’ too, and suddenly, on Here, Under Protest, the Utters have found themselves with this insanely stacked, Voltron-esque lineup, boasting a goddamned reckless cavalcade of vocal ability. That’s right, man. The Utters are bringin’ THREE FUCKING LEAD VOCALISTS to the table, and three vocalists that all could (and do) front amazing bands of their own. It’s like if Velvet Revolver was good or if the Backstreet Boys had stayed an oi band. Look, we’re getting off the subject. The point is, the Utters are back with their first full length in eight years, one that features Spike and Jack singing alongside Johnny and Darius for the first time in, uh…ever, and one that is going to kick the dicks of the Oi/Streetpunk scene like only a bunch of dudes with shitty jobs, axes to grind, beers to drink and a history of defining and putting out the best records of the genre can do.

Here, Under Protest is fourteen tracks of the Irish/Oi/streetpunk sound that you’ve come to expect from the Utters, and it’s also their best record. Look, all bios say that the musicianship is great and what you’ve become accustomed to is now being brought in bold new ways and then some, but this time, we’re talking about the Swingin’ Utters, and you already know how awesome they are, so let’s fuck the pretense, and close by saying that despite the smug, ‘eye on the exits’ title of Here, Under Protest, these dudes show no signs of slowing down after a staggering twenty-one years of doing it. So here’s a toast to the best new record by the best classic band in recent memory. In the words of my grandpa “To our wives and girlfriends! May they never meet!” Hey, whaddaya want? These are the Utters and it’s been eight years since their last record. Drink up! Don’t be such a dildo.


http://swinginutters.com
www.myspace.com/swinginutters
www.facebook.com/pages/Swingin-Utters/103212019714925

Wild Roses (feat. MarC Orrell of DKM)
Wild Roses--whose music has been described as Americana, country-rock, alt-rock, or just good old-fashioned rock ’n’ roll--features Marc Orrell (lead vocals, acoustic guitar, harmonica and accordion), Gavin Caswell (lap steel, slide guitar, electric guitar, mandolin and vocals), Jazz Limbo (bass guitar, songbird) and Evan Breese (drums).
https://www.facebook.com/wildrosesrock

Pitch Invasion
Pitch InvasionPitch Invasion is a five man mix of the old school punk sounds of the 80’s entwined with the California pop punk attitude of the 90’s. The band delivers an array of fast aggressive riffs and beats that will get anyone ready to destroy their peaceful neighbor’s serenity. The Pitch invasion is melodic at times with songs like Let’s Go and 20 Years to Life. They are also known for their ability to bludgeon their audience with crass 80’s style hardcore. For example, Three Fingers of Fun (use your imagination) and their name sake song Pitch Invasion. The band is fronted by Denver veteran rocker Jim Yelenick. His credits include Negative Man, Jet Black Joy and solo act Sputnik Slovenia. Timmy Invasion on lead guitar, Shane on rhythm guitar and Bart on bass. Both Shane and Bart lend their talents from the Denver skate punk band Frontside Five. Then last the master blaster himself Mr. Joey Chaos on Drums to round out the line up. Collectively these guys have shared the stage with most of their punk & rock n roll heroes. Ok so here’s the list: Agent Orange, D.R.I., The Dwarves, NOFX, The Bouncing Souls, The Adolescents, Christ on Parade, Brujaria, Strung Out, The Riverboat Gamblers, Zeke, Street Dogs, Mighty Mighty Boss tones, U.S. Bombs, McRad, ASG, Guttermouth, Hightower, Youth Brigade, Channel 3, Dead To Me, The Exploited, JFA, The Bronx, Mike Watt, Conflict, Hell’s Belles, Speedealer, Cephalic Carnage, The Adicts, The Skulls, Dr. Know, Naked Aggression, Total Chaos, Duane Peters Gunfight, The Briggs, Reverend Horton Heat, The Super Suckers, The Vandals, and Dick Dale to do some serious name dropping.

www.myspace.com/thepitchinvasion

St. Fall Apart
St. Fall ApartNow that the mid-’90s punk scene is firmly fixed in our cultural rearview mirror, it’s easy to long for a day when pop-punk bands didn’t cover themselves in makeup and bubblegum. Before that nostalgia fix sends you careening to dig out old-school Face To Face and Ten Foot Pole albums, let Denver’s St. Fall Apart scratch that itch. Combining grizzled vocals and crunched-out guitars with the sort of melodic sensibilities that make more clean-cut bands wads of money, the act’s “Whoa Is You” tackles the muscular riffs and larynx-busting vocals of pre-throat surgery Jawbreaker to recall the glory days of East Bay pop punk. - Matt Schild A.V. Club
https://www.facebook.com/stfallapart